Intune, Azure AD, and Zscaler Private Access

Securing the perimeter has become increasingly difficult with more and more services moving to the cloud and users needing, no, expecting, access from their personal devices. The days of relying on the walls of a network to “trust” access are fading fast, and some would say they’re long gone. This is why organizations are using Microsoft technologies to build out zero trust networks where they rely on device and user claims to evaluate access to resource both on and off network. As I’ve written about in the past, security comes in layers, and zero trust encompasses many layers of security behind the scenes.

Over the past few years, Microsoft has worked with many security and management vendors to integrate with Microsoft Intune and other solutions in EMS such as Azure Active Directory.

The following list is just an example of the many technology partnerships Microsoft has in place today.

To keep up to date with Microsoft security partners please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/enterprise-mobility-security/microsoft-intune?rtc=1

For this month’s post I’ll focus on Intune, Azure Active Directory, as well as a Microsoft security partner, Zscaler, particularly Zscaler Private Access and its integration with Azure AD and Intune.

What is Zscaler Private Access?

According to Christopher Hines, Head of Product Marketing at Zscaler:

“The Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) service provides users with seamless and secure access to private applications without placing them on the network and without exposing apps to the internet. Allowing enterprises to embrace a software-defined perimeter that supports all private apps and environments.”

More details about Zscaler may be found by visiting: : https://help.zscaler.com/zpa/getting-started/what-zscaler-private-access

Before we get started, I want to give special thanks to the following individuals I collaborated with for this post:

    • Tyler Castaldo – Microsoft Program Manager – Intune
    • David Creedy – Senior Product Manager – Web Security
    • Christopher Hines – Head of Product Marketing – ZPA and Zscaler App

Let’s get started

Zscaler SSO Setup

First, we need to set up Zscaler with Azure so we can provide SSO as users access the app. Once the user accesses the the Zscaler App on their device, they’ll be passed through to Azure AD for sign-on.

Setting up Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) requires a few steps so I won’t go through them, however the steps are well documented here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/saas-apps/zscalerprivateaccess-tutorial

In addition, Zscaler has also created their own documentation that may be referenced as well:

Adding Zscaler App to Intune for deployment

For this post I focus on iOS and Android. However, Zscaler is also supported on macOS and Windows 10 (more details at the bottom of this post).

After SSO is set up with Zscaler and Azure AD, we now need to add the Zscaler App to Intune for deployment.

Navigate to portal.azure.com or devicemanagement.microsoft.com and select “Client apps -> Apps”

Select “Add” then App Type and from the dropdown select iOS. Search for Zscaler and select “Zscaler App” as shown below. Add the app and assign it to a group for deployment.

For Android, repeat the steps above, however for the “App type” select “Android“. Use Managed Google Play in the console to search for Zscaler, then add and assign the app to a group for deployment.

Note: if you haven’t set up Managed Google Play with Intune yet, you will find details steps on how to do so by visiting: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/connect-intune-android-enterprise

When performing a search for “Zscaler” under apps in Intune you should see both assigned apps.

Configuring the Zscaler App using a VPN policy for iOS and app config for Android

Configuring Zscaler Private Access for iOS in Intune is straightforward as Intune has the settings available directly in the Intune adming portal UI as shown below.

Note: the “Organization’s cloud name” is case sensitive and FQDN and key/value pairs are optional, for more details please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/vpn-settings-ios#base-vpn-settings.

Select how the VPN will be launched:

Configure additional settings your organization requires to provide access to applications bridged by Zscaler:

For Android, we need to create an app configuration policy and assign it to the Zscaler App we added earlier.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-configuration-policies-use-android

Create an app configuration policy by navigating to “Client apps -> App configuration policies”

Select “Add”, provide the policy a name and from the “Device enrollment type” drop-down select “Android”.

Under “Associated app” select the Zscaler App added earlier.

Under “Configuration settings” select “Use configuration designer” from the drop-down and select all the options provided. Select ok to begin configuring the values.

Configure the values based on how your Zscaler environment is configured. In my case, my Zscaler environment is set up in Azure so I utilized the cloud name for the service in Azure as well as the domain my users log into. For username, I selected variable and chose “Partial UPN”.

Once all the settings are configured select “Ok” to complete the setup.

Note: you’ll notice the “deviceToken” value is set to “DummyValue”. This value isn’t needed when Azure AD is used as the identity provider (IdP), however it is needed in the profile, so just add it and type in whatever you like for the value. Also, please note the “Organization’s cloud name” is case sensitive.

After you’re finished with the app config policy, be sure to assign it to the same group you assigned the Zscaler App to.

Client experience

On first launch, the Zscaler App on iOS and/or Android it will redirect to sign-on using Azure AD, however subsequent launches of the Zscaler App will sign-in automatically.

Azure AD Conditional Access

To prevent access to an application Zscaler Private Access is securing access for, we need to create an Azure AD conditional access policy. The Azure AD Conditional Access policy will ensure the device and/or user meets compliance policies (e.g. Intune) before allowing access.

Navigate the Azure Active Directory in the Azure portal and select “Conditional Access”

Provide a name for the policy and under Cloud app add “Zscaler Private Access” and add the Zscaler cloud app used to access resources, i.e. the organization cloud name that points to the app we added earlier. The cloud app I utilize is called Zscaler ZSCloud as shown below.

Select the device platforms to target the Azure AD CA policy, since I’m focusing on iOS and Android in this post, I select iOS and Android from the devices platforms list.

Now grant access if the device is marked as compliant by Intune, enable the policy and save.

Note: additional conditions and access controls may be checked if needed.

If the device is compliant with Intune compliance policies, Zscaler will connect the user to the application. If the device isn’t compliant, Azure AD Conditional Access will block access to the application Zscaler provides access until the compliance issue is remediated.

Let’s see this in action

I’m testing with my Android device enrolled with Intune under Android Enterprise Device Owner as a fully managed device. The Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) App and ZPA App configuration is automatically deployed.

Intune_Zscaler.gif

Conclusion

In summary we learned how to set up Zscaler with Azure and provide SSO using Azure Active Directory. We also learned how to set up Zscaler Private Access App configuration and app deployment with Microsoft Intune. Finally, we learned how to set up an Azure Active Directory Conditional Access policy to further secure application access with Zscaler based on Intune device compliance.

I hope this post helps you and your organization further secure corporate applications, devices, users, and resources using Microsoft Intune, Azure Active Directory, and Zscaler Private Access. If you’re a Zscaler customer today, go out and give these steps a try.

Appendix

Information on setting up Zscaler for Windows and MacOS

Scan file servers, network shares, and SharePoint with Azure Information Protection Scanner

 

With GDPR just around the corner (May 2018), organizations are heads down identifying data, creating compliance processes, and hiring additional resources to lead the compliance and reporting required by GDPR.

In a previous post I reviewed GDPR as well as the technologies and services Microsoft offers to assist with discovery, managing, protecting, and reporting on data.

For this post I’ll expand on the topic of scanning file servers and SharePoint servers using a the Azure Information Protection Scanner or AIP Scanner.

 

Scanning SharePoint Server and File Shares

Azure Information Protection includes a scanning tool called the Azure Information Protection scanner or AIP scanner.  The AIP scanner is used to comb through file shares and SharePoint and identity and/or classify + protect data.

 

The scanner runs as a service on Windows Server and lets you discover, classify, and protect files on the following data stores:

  • Local folders on the Windows Server computer that runs the scanner.

  • UNC paths for network shares that use the Common Internet File System (CIFS) protocol.

  • Sites and libraries for SharePoint Server 2016 and SharePoint Server 2013.

Source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/deploy-use/deploy-aip-scanner 

 

Once the AIP scanner is deployed, use it to report on information you’re looking for and when discovery is complete, run the AIP scanner and apply classification with or without protection across those files.

The classification labels and encryption policies come from the Azure Information Protection service in Azure.  Labels may be defined with or without encryption.  At a minimum I recommend all information at least be classified.  To learn more about creating classification labels using Azure Information Protection please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/understand-explore/what-is-information-protection

 

I won’t go through the details of installation process as it’s clearly documented in the link I provide below.  However, the output below is from a scan I completed using the AIP scanner against a few sample files.  The AIP scanner will look for specific information based on the AIP policies that are configured (e.g. credit card info, passport numbers, etc.).

clip_image001

For more information about the Azure Information Protection scanner please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/deploy-use/deploy-aip-scanner

 

Automation

To help with automating the AIP Scanner process I created a script to walk through each option.  Feel free to utilize, however keep in mind when new AIP scanner versions are released you may need to update the script to accommodate new features. I also make no guarantees so use at your own risk.

 

#AIP Scanner Script

#Created by Courtenay Bernier

 

 

$AIPScannerLogFiles = $env:LOCALAPPDATA + ‘MicrosoftMSIPScannerReports’

 

#AIP scanner config

Write-Host “”

Write-Host ‘AIP scanner configuration’

Write-Host “”

$ScanMode = Read-Host -Prompt ‘ScanMode: Enforce | Discover’

$Type = Read-Host -Prompt ‘ScanType: Incremental | Full’

$ReportLevel = Read-Host -Prompt ‘ReportLevel: Off | Debug | Info | Error’

$Schedule = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Scanner Runtime Schedule: OneTime | Continuous | Never’     

$JustificationMessage  = Read-Host -Prompt ‘JustificationMessage: Free Text or leave blank’

 

Write-Host “The AIPScannerConfiguration options selected are: ‘$ScanMode‘, ‘$Type‘, $ReportLevel, $Schedule, $JustificationMessage

 

Set-AIPScannerConfiguration -ScanMode $ScanMode -Type $Type -ReportLevel $ReportLevel -Schedule $Schedule -JustificationMessage $JustificationMessage

 

Write-Host “”

Write-Host ‘This is the AIP Scanner Configuration set:’

Get-AIPScannerConfiguration

 

 

 

#AIP scanner repository

Write-Host “”

Write-Host ‘AIP scanner repository’

Write-Host “”

$OverrideLabel = Read-Host -Prompt ‘OverrideLabel: On | Off’

$SetDefaultlabel = Read-Host -Prompt ‘SetDefaultLabel: UsePolicyDefault | On | Off’

$PreserveFileDetails = Read-Host -Prompt ‘PreserveFileDetails: On | Off’

$DefaultOwner = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Specify the default owner by: email address or leave blank’

 

do {$DLID = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Add a default label ID by GUID? Yes or No’ }

until (‘yes’,‘no’ -contains $DLID)

 

if ($DLID -eq ‘yes’)

    {

        $DefaultLabelID = Read-Host -Prompt ‘specify the label GUID found in the AIP label policy’

 

    }

elseif ($DLID -eq ‘no’)

    {

       Write-Host “”

       write-host “No default label ID was added”

       Write-Host “”

    }

 

 

#add file location

$Path = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Fileshare or SPS Path: e.g. F:SharesFileShare or \networkpath or http://sp2013/Shared Documents’

Add-AIPScannerRepository $Path

Write-Host “”

 

 

#ask to add for more file locations

do {$answer = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Would you like to add another file location? Yes or No’

 

if ($answer -eq ‘yes’)

    {

       $Path = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Fileshare or SPS Path: e.g. F:SharesFileShare or \networkpath or http://sp2013/Shared Documents’  

  

       #add file location

       Add-AIPScannerRepository $Path

       Write-Host “”

 

    }

 

else

    {

       Write-Host “”

       write-host “No additional paths were added”

       Write-Host “”

       Write-Host “To remove repositories: use Remove-AIPScannerRepository share/sps path”

       Write-Host “”

       Get-AIPScannerRepository

       Write-Host “”

  

    }

}

Until ($answer -eq ‘no’)

 

 

#set AIP scanner repository

Write-Host “”

Write-Host ‘Setting scanner repository config:’

Set-AIPScannerRepository -OverrideLabel $OverrideLabel -PreserveFileDetails $PreserveFileDetails -DefaultOwner $DefaultOwner -Path $Path -DefaultLabelId $DefaultLabelID -SetDefaultLabel $SetDefaultLabel

 

 

#show file location(s)

Get-AIPScannerRepository

Write-Host “”

 

 

#start AIP scanner service or abort

do {$answer = Read-Host -Prompt ‘Are you ready to start the AIP Scanner Service? Yes or No’ }

until (‘yes’,‘no’ -contains $answer)

 

if ($answer -eq ‘yes’)

    {

       write-host “Starting AIP Scanner Service for ($ScanMode)”

       start-Service ‘Azure Information Protection Scanner’

       Write-Host “”

  

       #Show last AIP events

       Write-Host “waiting for eventlogs to populate”

       Start-Sleep -s 15

       Get-EventLog -Newest 4 -LogName ‘Azure Information Protection’ | Format-List -Property *

       Write-Host “”

  

       #Open Scanner Report Folder

       explorer $AIPScannerLogFiles

       Write-Host “”

    }

elseif ($answer -eq ‘no’)

 

    {

       Write-Host “”

       write-host “Canceling AIP Scan”

       Write-Host “”

       Write-Host “To remove repositories: use Remove-AIPScannerRepository share/sps path”

       Write-Host “”

    }

 

 

Microsoft Flow and Azure AD – let’s automate!

 

When I speak with organizations we often discuss scenarios such as having an onboarding process that is in need of a front-end utility and automation.  Many organizations have cloud services and on premises applications where the user onboarding process in some cases is still a manual procedure.  To assist with these processes and many others, Microsoft offers as service called Microsoft Flow.  I’m always looking for creative uses of applications and Microsoft Flow offers just what we need to help automate processes such as account management across applications and services.  In addition, Microsoft Flow goes well beyond just automating a user management processes (e.g. onboarding) as discussed below.

 

What is Microsoft Flow?

“Microsoft Flow is a service that helps you create automated workflows between your favorite apps and services to synchronize files, get notifications, collect data, and more.”

Source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/flow/getting-started

Microsoft Flow allows you to create workflows to automate tasks, for example, when files are added to a folder in a cloud storage environment such as OneDrive or Box, notify a user. Or create an approval workflow process to manage tweets before they’re posted to Twitter.

 

Microsoft Flow offers connectors to connect to either cloud applications or on premises environments.

To view a list of Microsoft Flow connectors, please visit: https://us.flow.microsoft.com/en-us/connectors/

 

In addition, there are many pre-defined templates that may be utilized such as starting an approval process when a new item is added to SharePoint or save tweets to an Excel file or sync files between cloud drives or a file server via FTP.  The list goes on and on…

To view a list of Microsoft Flow templates, please visit: https://us.flow.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/

 

Microsoft Flow Licensing

Some features are free and require premium Flow sku.  For more details about Microsoft Flow licensing please visit: https://flow.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/

Microsoft Flow FAQ: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/flow/frequently-asked-questions

 

For this post, I will utilize Microsoft Flow to create users in Azure AD as well as provide custom bonus flows! so let’s get started…

As an administrator, the first thing we need to do is access Microsoft Flow and create a new workflow.

Navigate to https://flow.microsoft.com and sign-in.

Search for Azure AD in the search box provided as shown below:

image

 

From the results page, locate and select “Create Azure AD User From Button”

image

 

From there select “Continue” to add the template:

image

 

For more details about the Microsoft Flow Azure AD connector and templates, please visit: https://us.flow.microsoft.com/en-us/connectors/shared_azuread/azure-ad/

 

From here you can use the template as is and select Create flow, or you change the name and edit the steps in the template provided:

image

 

I chose to edit the “Send an email” step in the flow as I wanted a little more detail, I began the editing process by selecting “Send an email”:

image

 

The default template only offers a one-line sentence of info, however I changed it to add information the manager and the end user would need:

image

 

We can also edit each flow step or add more if necessary by deleting or adding fields (if the field is used downstream in the flow you’ll need to delete the field first downstream):

image

image

 

“Adding an Azure AD User” Flow in action

The great thing about Microsoft Flow is a flow may be run on a schedule, via an event or trigger, or manually from the web or the Mobile app. 

Additionally, Flow templates may be shared out to other users to access as well, so administrators don’t always need to be in the process.  Ultimately a Flow template configuration is up to you and what works best for your processes within your organization

 

Flow Web App

To manually start the newly created Flow template, when in the Flow template select “More” from the top and then select “Run now”

image

 

From there the template with a list of fields will open for a user to manually fill in:

image

 

Once all the fields are filled in properly, select “Run flow” and a new user will be created in Azure AD.  I show more details and results below using the mobile app.

 

Mobile App

I find the Microsoft Flow mobile app very easy to use, especially when on the go.  In fact, flows may be created and edited directly from the Microsoft Flow app.

Download the Microsoft Flow app from your favorite app store, in my case I have the iOS app installed on my device.  The first time Microsoft Flow app is launched you’ll need to sign into your Azure AD tenant (be sure that user has rights to create users, groups, access apps, etc.).

 

Select “Buttons” at the bottom of the app:

SNAGHTML4c3e814e

 

Locate the the button that will create the Azure AD User:

image

 

Fill out the form and submit:

image

 

Here are my inputs from my Flow template process, when finished select “Done” at the top of the app and the Flow will run:

imageimage

 

Once the Flow has completed, we can look at the run history and the details of each flow process (great for troubleshooting as well):

imageimage

 

Expanding the “Send an email” flow we see the following:

image

 

Below is the customized email received by a user or manager after the user is created (including a randomly generated password):

image

 

Lastly, below is the user that was created by the Flow process in the Azure AD admin portal:

image

 

Dynamic groups

Once users are created, dynamic group memberships may be used to automatically assign users to group, for example, any user may be dynamically assigned to Group A. Group A can also be assigned to licenses, SaaS applications or assigned to SharePoint Online/OneDrive, so as soon as a user is assigned to a group they’ll have access to the licenses and apps assigned to it.

Dynamic group membership eases the management process of adding and removing users to applications. Simply assign a group to the application permission and use dynamic group rules to automatically assign and remove users. You can even use attributes such as employeeId, mail, or companyName as attributes to look for, however there are many more attributes to choose from and depending where the users originates from, you may want to get creative.  Finally, for applications that support provisioning, users may be automatically provisioned and provisioned to SaaS applications which provides full user lifecycle management.

For more details about Azure AD Dynamic Groups please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-groups-dynamic-membership-azure-portal

 

BONUS FLOWS 

Need to disable or enable sign-on for a user quickly in Azure AD (i.e. O365, Dynamics365, etc.) from your mobile device?  I created Flows to do that.

 

Current sign-in state of the user shown in Azure AD and O365 Portals (it’s the same setting btw) shown below:

imageSNAGHTML13b5bc02

 

I created a button in Microsoft Flow and filling out the following fields in red:

image

 

When the flow is run, type in the UPN (email address) of the users and flow will disable sign-on for that user.

image

image

 

New sign-in state of the user shown in Azure AD and O365 Portals (it’s the same setting btw) now blocked shown below:

imageimage

 

Enable sign-on for an Azure AD user

Follow the Flow creation process above to create a Flow to enable a user to sign-on, however change the “Account Enabled” setting to “Yes”.  Note: Flows may be copied, to copy a flow select Save As for the flow you’d like to copy in the Flow portal and modify from there.

As a result we’ll end up with two flow as shown below:

image

 

And the flow buttons on my mobile device:

SNAGHTML14328189

 

Delete Azure AD Users

Now a question you may have is “can we delete Azure AD Users using a button?”  You could, however there is nothing built in with Flow or connectors today.  A custom app would need to be developed with the proper permissions to the Microsoft Graph to delete an account then added to flow.  So this would be more of a custom development approach that what I demonstrated in this post.  As a result, using Microsoft Flow we can create a custom connector that will call into the app registered with Azure AD to make calls to delete users using a button flow in Microsoft Flow.  Same holds true for resetting user passwords.

With Microsoft Flow, the possibilities are endless with the predefined templates and built-in connectors to services, you don’t have to be a developer to automate processes and workflows!

Regulations and data management in a hybrid world

 

I speak with a lot of organizations and often they’re interested in locating, tagging, and controlling data for various reasons such as legal, regulatory, or protecting personal and proprietary information.

However, there’s one regulation that keeps popping up and it’s the new EU General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR.  GDPR will be enforced on May 25, 2018, which is just around the corner.  Unfortunately, GDPR is not a one-time process, it’s an ongoing regulation and failure to comply could result in heavy fines.  For most organizations, data may be stored across all types of systems and services including backups so locating and managing data across those environments may be difficult.

For this post, Microsoft provides guidance around GDPR and I’ve utilized some of the terms and guidance provided to simply the overview.

To learn more about how Microsoft is addressing GPDR please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Privacy/gdpr/default.aspx

The categories below align with the Microsoft GDPR guidance provided in documentation above, however I’ve attempted to simplify while targeting Office 365 and Enterprise Mobility + Security.  The last topic I’ll discuss is how to identity and classify information across SharePoint Server and file shares.

 

Let’s take a look at the four pillars of addressing data management requirements:

image

clip_image001[4]

 

Tying everything together, we have a process to identify, manage, protect, and report on data:

clip_image002[4]

 

Now that we have a definable process, let’s align the Microsoft services around all four categories, again the area of focus here is EMS and O365:

clip_image003[4]

image

 

 

Let’s take close look at some of the details across the Microsoft offerings:

Azure Active Directory

  • Lay the foundation for your organization by protecting access to sensitive information, which starts with modernizing your identities with Azure Active Directory. Whether a cloud or on premises application, Azure Active Directory will act as a controlled gateway to your data.

Azure Information Protection

  • Automated Classification, Labeling, and Protection + File scanner for file servers and SharePoint.

Office 365 Data Loss Prevention

  • Identify and retain data by applying retention policies to data across O365 services. Discover data through eDiscovery and actions on data via O365 audit logs.

Exchange Online

  • Prevent data from leaking by creating message rules to stop sensitive information from being sent through email. Ties into Data Loss Prevention as described above.

Microsoft Cloud App Security

  • Discover, monitor access, and apply governance to sensitive data across cloud services.

Microsoft Intune Application Protection

  • Protect information from leaking to non-protected applications and accounts across devices such as iOS, Android, and Windows.

Microsoft Power BI

  • Create insightful and visual reports by importing audit data into Power BI.

 

SharePoint Server and File Shares

I understand the previously mentioned services are great for managing data across cloud services, however what about on premises environments?

Azure Information Protection includes a scanning tool called the Azure Information Protection scanner or AIP scanner.  The AIP scanner is used to comb through file shares and SharePoint and identity and/or classify + protect data.

Once the AIP scanner is installed, use it to report on information you’re looking for and when discovery is complete, run the AIP scanner and apply classification and protection across those files.

Below is the output of an AIP scanner scan I ran against a few sample files.  The AIP scanner will look for specific information based on the AIP policies that are configured (e.g. credit card info).

image

For more information about the Azure Information Protection scanner please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/deploy-use/deploy-aip-scanner

 

All the services described above dovetail nicely with GDPR and other regulations requiring control of data.  If you don’t believe your organization is affected by a regulation such as GDPR I highly encourage further research as you may find out that your organization actually is.  Unfortunately, there are steep penalties with non-compliance so doing some research before May will save organizations time and money.

 

Again, to learn more about how Microsoft is addressing GPDR as well as managing data across other services such as Microsoft Azure, Dynamics 365, SQL Server, etc. please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Privacy/gdpr/default.aspx

Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication – tracking sign-on activity with event viewer and Microsoft OMS

 

Quick post today around Active Directory sign-on auditing when using AAD Connect Pass-Through Authentication.

 

Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication (PTA) provides the ability to pass authentication off directly to domain controllers. When passwords are reset or changed they’re reflected in Azure AD immediately via Azure AD Connect sync. Additionally, self-service password reset (SSPR) may be enabled in Azure Active Directory and those resets are written back to the domain controller as well.

To learn more about the available sign-on options please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-user-signin

Many organizations already have extensive auditing set up to track sign-on activities and need to continue to track sign-on activity in across all services and need to maintain tracking no matter what services or applications are in use.  To continue the auditing practice with Azure AD Connect PTA let’s walk through how this is achieved.

 

Requirements

  • Active Directory Auditing is enabled via Group Policy.  Look under Audit Policies –> Logon/Logoff and Account Logon and enable auditing there.
  • Azure AD Connect with Pass-Through Authentication and Password Write Back enabled.
  • Optional: an additional Pass-Through Authentication connector deployed for high availability.

 

Example of my Active Directory audit policies:

image

image

 

Lets take a look at what to look for when using Azure AD Connect PTA.

As a user sign’s on to O365, or a federated SaaS app, or an internal application published to Azure AD, there are three events that are logged, two events to the domain controller: 4768, 4769 and one event to the server where ADD Connect is installed and PTA is enabled: 4624 (if additional PTA connectors are deployed for high availability look on those servers for 4624 as well).

 

On the domain controller look for events 4768 and 4769:

clip_image001

clip_image002

 

On the server where AD Connect is installed (and or additional PTA connector servers) look for event 4624:

clip_image004

 

Additionally, we can roll up these events to a SIEM for further aggregation of sign-on events and auditing. In my case I chose to use Log Analytics within the Microsoft Operations Management Suite:

clip_image006

 

To learn more about Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication please visit the following links:

AAD Connect PTA: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-pass-through-authentication

AAD Connect PTA w/Desktop SSO: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-sso

AAD Connect PTA TS Guide: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-troubleshoot-sso

Windows Information Protection Explained – Windows 10 Creators Update

 

With the release of Windows 10 Creators Update there have been many enhancements to Windows 10. For this post, I’ll focus on an expanded feature that is only available in version 1703 (i.e. Creators Update).

In Windows 10 version 1607 we released Windows Information Protection where devices that are enrolled with Microsoft Intune (or SCCM) may receive policies that protect corporate application content from data leaks. In Windows 10 1703 (i.e. Creators Update) a new feature called Mobile Application Management or MAM is available. If you’re familiar with MAM policies for Intune for iOS and Android we’ve brought similar functionality to Windows 10 Creators Update for non-managed devices. This means that non-managed devices such a home user PC with Creators Update can access corporate data without risking data leakage because the MAM policy will prevent cutting and copying data to unmanaged applications.


Requirements

  • Intune licenses
  • Global Admin for Azure Active Directory
  • Windows 10 Creators Update (any version)

Getting started

Service setup

  1. Navigate to portal.azure.com from a browser
  2. Select Azure Active Directory
  3. Select Mobility (MDM and MAM)
  4. Add or select Microsoft Intune

 

clip_image002

 

Verify the settings look similar to those in the image below. Add a group as well to make sure the policies flow to the proper individuals:

Note: if the MAM Discovery URL is missing, select “Restore default MAM URLs”

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Policy setup

From the Azure portal locate the Intune Mobile Application Management (MAM) service. It will look similar to the following:

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Select “App Policy” and “Add a policy” at the top. Give the policy a name and select Windows 10 under Platform.

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Now we need to configure what apps the MAM policy will apply to. Do this by selecting “Allowed apps” and then “Add app” at the top of the blade:

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Fortunately, many Microsoft applications are already published to select from, for the purposes of this post I’m going to select Microsoft Edge, Notepad, and IE11. The apps in this list are what we call “enlightened apps” where they know about MAM policies. Refer to the links at the end of this post for how non-enlightened apps are supported.

Note: For custom apps, desktop apps, etc. that need to be added, information about these apps is easily found using App Locker via the local policy editor on the device where the apps are installed. More details: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/windows-information-protection/app-behavior-with-wip

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Data Protection

After selecting apps from the list, in my case Notepad, Edge, and IE11 we now need to configure the behavior of when protected data is moved from those apps to non-protected environments (e.g. WordPad).

Select “Required settings” from the policy. The only change I made is to select “Allow Overrides” which means the user will be prompted when they attempt to relocate corporate data outside of the managed app (very similar to how MAM works with iOS and Android):

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Now move to “Advanced settings” where there are a number of options to further restrict and identify boundaries.  For this post I’ll keep it simple by adding a cloud resource as a network boundary, in this case SharePoint Online and turn on “Show the enterprise data protection icon” for the protected enlightened apps:

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Note: Once service and client are configured, you may encounter site access issues, to remediate, add the Value “|/*AppCompat*/” (no quotes) string to the end of the URL string, more details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/windows-information-protection/app-behavior-with-wip

 

Once the boundaries are set and saved, we need to assign the policy to a group of users.  Feel free to create any group you want in Azure AD, I created one called MAM-WE_Users:

Note: users may be dynamically assigned to Azure AD groups as well for auto assignment to apps, licenses, etc., more details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-accessmanagement-groups-with-advanced-rules

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Client setup

The end user will need to attach their non-managed (e.g. personal) Windows device with Creator Update to their workplace by selecting “Settings” then “Access work or school” and then “Connect” as shown below.

Note: Non admin users may enroll in MAM.

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The user will then be prompted to sign on to their corporate account (i.e. O365, Azure AD, Intune, etc. if available) account as shown below (do not join Azure AD or local AD, typically this is performed only for corporate issued/owned devices).

To summarize, there are two steps, add your email and select next.

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Once the account is verified, and the device is registered, select the account and the Info:

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The “Info” button will show the last time the device had a successful sync. Also make sure the Management Server Address is populated. Keep this in mind as we’ll refer to this process after we have the MAM policy set up.

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End User Experience

Because I’m protecting “.cbenterprisemobility.sharepoint.com” and selected both IE11 and Edge (they’re both enlightened apps) when I navigate to them we see a little briefcase icon show up.  When I navigate away from this site, the briefcase will go away.

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For example, when I download a file from SharePoint Online, it will contain a little briefcase on the file icon as well as state the ownership of the file in “File ownership” column.  Additionally, the MAM policy can use either a custom EFS certificate or and Azure Information Protection template (RMS) to protect files.

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When I open the file in a managed app (i.e. Notepad) and because the file is protected by policy, the app shows it’s managed by displaying a briefcase icon on the app itself:

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Clicking on the briefcase icon we see the following:

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When I attempt to cut, copy, and even open the file in an unmanaged app such as WordPad I receive the following prompt.  I can choose to give access in which case that action is logged to event viewer or cancel.  This prompt may be hidden from the user completely by changing the policy in Intune.  Separate policies may also be created and targeted at specific groups of users as well.  For example maybe you want to allow Executives to override as shown below and block certain users such as contractors, etc.

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Closer look at the prompt:

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If you need to change the file ownership, I right click on a file and change the file ownership to Personal if needed:

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That’s all, we configured Mobile Application Management for a non-managed or domain enrolled Windows 10 client and successfully protected corporate content from leaking outside of corporate sanctioned applications.

Troubleshooting

  • First place to look is to make sure the settings are correct and sync’s are successful under Windows 10 Settings/Accounts/Access work or school
  • Next steps are to look in event viewer under: Application and Services Logs/Microsoft/Windows/Microsoft-Windows-DeviceManagement-Enterprise-Diagnostics-Provider/Admin
  • MAM policies also land under: c:windowssystem32AppLocker folder and you can open the “policy” files in notepad.
  • You’ll also find the MAM policy settings populated under the following registry keys: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftPolicyManagercurrentdevice
  • When adding apps to protect, the prepopulated apps should be adequate, however if you’re adding protected apps by hand make sure the format is correct or the MAM policy will not take effect on that app.
  • When users upgrade from MAM to MDM on Windows Home edition, they lose access to WIP. On the Home edition, we do not recommend pushing MDM policies to enable users to upgrade.  More details here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/commercialize/customize/mdm/implement-server-side-mobile-application-management

Closing thoughts

With all the data theft that happens daily, it’s better to have increased security for non-managed devices than simply guessing if your data is secure from those devices.  Whether your users have iOS, Android, or Windows devices, Intune MAM will protect all three.

Another option is to block unmanaged devices completely and Azure Active Directory Premium with or without Intune will address this scenario via Conditional Access.

For additional details about MAM with and without MDM as well as supporting desktop and custom apps, please refer to:

Azure AD Geolocation by sign-in activity using Power BI

 

If you’re an Office 365 customer or even an Azure customer then you’re probably familiar with Azure Active Directory (or Azure AD).  Azure AD is the core identity provider that the majority of Microsoft services rely on for authentication.  For today’s post I thought it would be interesting to pull sign-in activity into Power BI and show how simple it is to display a dashboard of geolocated sign-ins by user and device.

 

Assumptions

The user creating Power BI reports has an Azure AD Premium and Power BI licenses assigned

Note, if a new user account was recently created, I recommend waiting a day for the sign-in data to fully populate otherwise no sign-in data will be present.  Check the Azure AD Premium admin portal for sign-in activity for the user periodically.  Once the sign-in data is present, refresh the Power BI dataset connection to pull it into Power BI.  More details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-reporting-faq

 

First we’ll need to sign into Power BI and pull in the Azure AD Activity Logs Content Pack.  Do this in Power BI by selecting Get Data, Services (Get), then search for Azure.  Select Azure Active Directory Activity Logs (Preview) from the search results and provide your Azure AD domain name and then select next.

Once the Azure Active Directory Activity Logs (Preview) content is added we can begin to create a dashboard.  From the Power BI UI find the “Azure Active Directory Activity Logs” under Dataset and select it.  Under “Visualizations” select Map and under “Fields” expand “Signin Activity” and select City, Country, Name, and Total Signins.  Without any further modifications your map should look similar to the following:

 

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Feel free to play around with the data to get the information you find most interesting or better yet, what your security team will find most interesting.  Hover over the data circles to display additional information about the data point.

 

Now a map of sign-ins may be all that is required, however I went a step further and created two slicers to drill in on certain data points.  To add slicers, select the Slicer image from under Visualizations from under Fields expand “Unique Users” and then select “Details.Name”.

 

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To add another slicer, repeat the process from above, only instead of expanding Unique Users, expand “Signin Activity” and then select “Device Information”

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Adding slicers enables me to check mark interesting information and drill down on that specific data point.  Pulling it all together the final dashboard looks like the following:

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If I want to hone in on a specific data point, all I need to do is select either a data point under one of the slicers as shown in the gif below:

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Update
Add a slicer for date and time to show time based sign-in activity:

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This was just a simple method of creating a Power BI report that show’s a lot of rich data points that may help you understand where your users are logging in across the globe from what browser or device.  In addition, use the Azure AD Premium to create conditional access policies to protect user identities, corporate information, and block malicious devices, apps, and browsers from unsecure locations.