Windows update compliance – Querying Azure Log Analytics data using PowerShell

 

With the abundance of data across services it’s important to have a method (API) to access the data for export.  Most organizations I speak with have some sort of SIEM to aggregate data and analyze it for informational and alerting purposes.  Microsoft also offers a service called Microsoft Operations Management suite and within that suite is a service called Log Analytics.  For more details about Log Analytics please visit: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/log-analytics/ 

For the purposes of this post we’ll look at how to query Log Analytics using PowerShell.

 

Requirements

Azure Log Analytics workspace (aka OMS)

Add and configure solutions so data is available to query

 

Let’s get started

Sign into Azure Log Analytics

Download the module from the PowerShell reference link above.

 

Here’s a view of the Log Analytics portal, for this post I’ll focus on Windows Analytics

SNAGHTML6bdc4ff

 

PowerShell access

Open PowerShell ISE and import the module

Import-Module .LogAnalyticsQuery.psm1

In the query below I’m looking for Windows devices that are missing security updates:

$Query = @’

WaaSUpdateStatus

| where NeedAttentionStatus==”Missing multiple security updates”

| render table

‘@

$SubID = “subscriptionID

$ResourceGrp = “resource group

$workspace=”workspace name

$(Invoke-LogAnalyticsQuery -WorkspaceName $workspace -SubscriptionId $SubID -ResourceGroup $ResourceGrp -Query $Query).Results|Out-GridView

 

Below is the output from PowerShell query using GridView.  Because the data is in JSON format we can use the data to import into an existing SIEM or dump the data in whatever format needed.

image

 

 

Below is a view of a query from log analytics, as we can see the query’s are identical using both methods.  So utilizing the Log Analytics portal, we can craft queries and then use those queries in our PowerShell scripts to extract data.  I recommend using the Log Analytics portal to prove out queries before utilize PowerShell.

image

 

References

Regulations and data management in a hybrid world

 

I speak with a lot of organizations and often they’re interested in locating, tagging, and controlling data for various reasons such as legal, regulatory, or protecting personal and proprietary information.

However, there’s one regulation that keeps popping up and it’s the new EU General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR.  GDPR will be enforced on May 25, 2018, which is just around the corner.  Unfortunately, GDPR is not a one-time process, it’s an ongoing regulation and failure to comply could result in heavy fines.  For most organizations, data may be stored across all types of systems and services including backups so locating and managing data across those environments may be difficult.

For this post, Microsoft provides guidance around GDPR and I’ve utilized some of the terms and guidance provided to simply the overview.

To learn more about how Microsoft is addressing GPDR please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Privacy/gdpr/default.aspx

The categories below align with the Microsoft GDPR guidance provided in documentation above, however I’ve attempted to simplify while targeting Office 365 and Enterprise Mobility + Security.  The last topic I’ll discuss is how to identity and classify information across SharePoint Server and file shares.

 

Let’s take a look at the four pillars of addressing data management requirements:

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Tying everything together, we have a process to identify, manage, protect, and report on data:

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Now that we have a definable process, let’s align the Microsoft services around all four categories, again the area of focus here is EMS and O365:

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Let’s take close look at some of the details across the Microsoft offerings:

Azure Active Directory

  • Lay the foundation for your organization by protecting access to sensitive information, which starts with modernizing your identities with Azure Active Directory. Whether a cloud or on premises application, Azure Active Directory will act as a controlled gateway to your data.

Azure Information Protection

  • Automated Classification, Labeling, and Protection + File scanner for file servers and SharePoint.

Office 365 Data Loss Prevention

  • Identify and retain data by applying retention policies to data across O365 services. Discover data through eDiscovery and actions on data via O365 audit logs.

Exchange Online

  • Prevent data from leaking by creating message rules to stop sensitive information from being sent through email. Ties into Data Loss Prevention as described above.

Microsoft Cloud App Security

  • Discover, monitor access, and apply governance to sensitive data across cloud services.

Microsoft Intune Application Protection

  • Protect information from leaking to non-protected applications and accounts across devices such as iOS, Android, and Windows.

Microsoft Power BI

  • Create insightful and visual reports by importing audit data into Power BI.

 

SharePoint Server and File Shares

I understand the previously mentioned services are great for managing data across cloud services, however what about on premises environments?

Azure Information Protection includes a scanning tool called the Azure Information Protection scanner or AIP scanner.  The AIP scanner is used to comb through file shares and SharePoint and identity and/or classify + protect data.

Once the AIP scanner is installed, use it to report on information you’re looking for and when discovery is complete, run the AIP scanner and apply classification and protection across those files.

Below is the output of an AIP scanner scan I ran against a few sample files.  The AIP scanner will look for specific information based on the AIP policies that are configured (e.g. credit card info).

image

For more information about the Azure Information Protection scanner please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/deploy-use/deploy-aip-scanner

 

All the services described above dovetail nicely with GDPR and other regulations requiring control of data.  If you don’t believe your organization is affected by a regulation such as GDPR I highly encourage further research as you may find out that your organization actually is.  Unfortunately, there are steep penalties with non-compliance so doing some research before May will save organizations time and money.

 

Again, to learn more about how Microsoft is addressing GPDR as well as managing data across other services such as Microsoft Azure, Dynamics 365, SQL Server, etc. please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Privacy/gdpr/default.aspx

Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication – tracking sign-on activity with event viewer and Microsoft OMS

 

Quick post today around Active Directory sign-on auditing when using AAD Connect Pass-Through Authentication.

 

Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication (PTA) provides the ability to pass authentication off directly to domain controllers. When passwords are reset or changed they’re reflected in Azure AD immediately via Azure AD Connect sync. Additionally, self-service password reset (SSPR) may be enabled in Azure Active Directory and those resets are written back to the domain controller as well.

To learn more about the available sign-on options please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-user-signin

Many organizations already have extensive auditing set up to track sign-on activities and need to continue to track sign-on activity in across all services and need to maintain tracking no matter what services or applications are in use.  To continue the auditing practice with Azure AD Connect PTA let’s walk through how this is achieved.

 

Requirements

  • Active Directory Auditing is enabled via Group Policy.  Look under Audit Policies –> Logon/Logoff and Account Logon and enable auditing there.
  • Azure AD Connect with Pass-Through Authentication and Password Write Back enabled.
  • Optional: an additional Pass-Through Authentication connector deployed for high availability.

 

Example of my Active Directory audit policies:

image

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Lets take a look at what to look for when using Azure AD Connect PTA.

As a user sign’s on to O365, or a federated SaaS app, or an internal application published to Azure AD, there are three events that are logged, two events to the domain controller: 4768, 4769 and one event to the server where ADD Connect is installed and PTA is enabled: 4624 (if additional PTA connectors are deployed for high availability look on those servers for 4624 as well).

 

On the domain controller look for events 4768 and 4769:

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On the server where AD Connect is installed (and or additional PTA connector servers) look for event 4624:

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Additionally, we can roll up these events to a SIEM for further aggregation of sign-on events and auditing. In my case I chose to use Log Analytics within the Microsoft Operations Management Suite:

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To learn more about Azure AD Connect Pass-Through Authentication please visit the following links:

AAD Connect PTA: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-pass-through-authentication

AAD Connect PTA w/Desktop SSO: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-sso

AAD Connect PTA TS Guide: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/connect/active-directory-aadconnect-troubleshoot-sso

Windows Information Protection Explained – Windows 10 Creators Update

 

With the release of Windows 10 Creators Update there have been many enhancements to Windows 10. For this post, I’ll focus on an expanded feature that is only available in version 1703 (i.e. Creators Update).

In Windows 10 version 1607 we released Windows Information Protection where devices that are enrolled with Microsoft Intune (or SCCM) may receive policies that protect corporate application content from data leaks. In Windows 10 1703 (i.e. Creators Update) a new feature called Mobile Application Management or MAM is available. If you’re familiar with MAM policies for Intune for iOS and Android we’ve brought similar functionality to Windows 10 Creators Update for non-managed devices. This means that non-managed devices such a home user PC with Creators Update can access corporate data without risking data leakage because the MAM policy will prevent cutting and copying data to unmanaged applications.


Requirements

  • Intune licenses
  • Global Admin for Azure Active Directory
  • Windows 10 Creators Update (any version)

Getting started

Service setup

  1. Navigate to portal.azure.com from a browser
  2. Select Azure Active Directory
  3. Select Mobility (MDM and MAM)
  4. Add or select Microsoft Intune

 

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Verify the settings look similar to those in the image below. Add a group as well to make sure the policies flow to the proper individuals:

Note: if the MAM Discovery URL is missing, select “Restore default MAM URLs”

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Policy setup

From the Azure portal locate the Intune Mobile Application Management (MAM) service. It will look similar to the following:

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Select “App Policy” and “Add a policy” at the top. Give the policy a name and select Windows 10 under Platform.

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Now we need to configure what apps the MAM policy will apply to. Do this by selecting “Allowed apps” and then “Add app” at the top of the blade:

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Fortunately, many Microsoft applications are already published to select from, for the purposes of this post I’m going to select Microsoft Edge, Notepad, and IE11. The apps in this list are what we call “enlightened apps” where they know about MAM policies. Refer to the links at the end of this post for how non-enlightened apps are supported.

Note: For custom apps, desktop apps, etc. that need to be added, information about these apps is easily found using App Locker via the local policy editor on the device where the apps are installed. More details: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/windows-information-protection/app-behavior-with-wip

clip_image012

 

Data Protection

After selecting apps from the list, in my case Notepad, Edge, and IE11 we now need to configure the behavior of when protected data is moved from those apps to non-protected environments (e.g. WordPad).

Select “Required settings” from the policy. The only change I made is to select “Allow Overrides” which means the user will be prompted when they attempt to relocate corporate data outside of the managed app (very similar to how MAM works with iOS and Android):

clip_image014

 

Now move to “Advanced settings” where there are a number of options to further restrict and identify boundaries.  For this post I’ll keep it simple by adding a cloud resource as a network boundary, in this case SharePoint Online and turn on “Show the enterprise data protection icon” for the protected enlightened apps:

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Note: Once service and client are configured, you may encounter site access issues, to remediate, add the Value “|/*AppCompat*/” (no quotes) string to the end of the URL string, more details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/threat-protection/windows-information-protection/app-behavior-with-wip

 

Once the boundaries are set and saved, we need to assign the policy to a group of users.  Feel free to create any group you want in Azure AD, I created one called MAM-WE_Users:

Note: users may be dynamically assigned to Azure AD groups as well for auto assignment to apps, licenses, etc., more details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-accessmanagement-groups-with-advanced-rules

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Client setup

The end user will need to attach their non-managed (e.g. personal) Windows device with Creator Update to their workplace by selecting “Settings” then “Access work or school” and then “Connect” as shown below.

Note: Non admin users may enroll in MAM.

clip_image020

 

The user will then be prompted to sign on to their corporate account (i.e. O365, Azure AD, Intune, etc. if available) account as shown below (do not join Azure AD or local AD, typically this is performed only for corporate issued/owned devices).

To summarize, there are two steps, add your email and select next.

clip_image022

 

Once the account is verified, and the device is registered, select the account and the Info:

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The “Info” button will show the last time the device had a successful sync. Also make sure the Management Server Address is populated. Keep this in mind as we’ll refer to this process after we have the MAM policy set up.

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End User Experience

Because I’m protecting “.cbenterprisemobility.sharepoint.com” and selected both IE11 and Edge (they’re both enlightened apps) when I navigate to them we see a little briefcase icon show up.  When I navigate away from this site, the briefcase will go away.

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For example, when I download a file from SharePoint Online, it will contain a little briefcase on the file icon as well as state the ownership of the file in “File ownership” column.  Additionally, the MAM policy can use either a custom EFS certificate or and Azure Information Protection template (RMS) to protect files.

clip_image032

 

When I open the file in a managed app (i.e. Notepad) and because the file is protected by policy, the app shows it’s managed by displaying a briefcase icon on the app itself:

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Clicking on the briefcase icon we see the following:

clip_image036

 

When I attempt to cut, copy, and even open the file in an unmanaged app such as WordPad I receive the following prompt.  I can choose to give access in which case that action is logged to event viewer or cancel.  This prompt may be hidden from the user completely by changing the policy in Intune.  Separate policies may also be created and targeted at specific groups of users as well.  For example maybe you want to allow Executives to override as shown below and block certain users such as contractors, etc.

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Closer look at the prompt:

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If you need to change the file ownership, I right click on a file and change the file ownership to Personal if needed:

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That’s all, we configured Mobile Application Management for a non-managed or domain enrolled Windows 10 client and successfully protected corporate content from leaking outside of corporate sanctioned applications.

Troubleshooting

  • First place to look is to make sure the settings are correct and sync’s are successful under Windows 10 Settings/Accounts/Access work or school
  • Next steps are to look in event viewer under: Application and Services Logs/Microsoft/Windows/Microsoft-Windows-DeviceManagement-Enterprise-Diagnostics-Provider/Admin
  • MAM policies also land under: c:windowssystem32AppLocker folder and you can open the “policy” files in notepad.
  • You’ll also find the MAM policy settings populated under the following registry keys: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftPolicyManagercurrentdevice
  • When adding apps to protect, the prepopulated apps should be adequate, however if you’re adding protected apps by hand make sure the format is correct or the MAM policy will not take effect on that app.
  • When users upgrade from MAM to MDM on Windows Home edition, they lose access to WIP. On the Home edition, we do not recommend pushing MDM policies to enable users to upgrade.  More details here: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/commercialize/customize/mdm/implement-server-side-mobile-application-management

Closing thoughts

With all the data theft that happens daily, it’s better to have increased security for non-managed devices than simply guessing if your data is secure from those devices.  Whether your users have iOS, Android, or Windows devices, Intune MAM will protect all three.

Another option is to block unmanaged devices completely and Azure Active Directory Premium with or without Intune will address this scenario via Conditional Access.

For additional details about MAM with and without MDM as well as supporting desktop and custom apps, please refer to:

Azure AD Geolocation by sign-in activity using Power BI

 

If you’re an Office 365 customer or even an Azure customer then you’re probably familiar with Azure Active Directory (or Azure AD).  Azure AD is the core identity provider that the majority of Microsoft services rely on for authentication.  For today’s post I thought it would be interesting to pull sign-in activity into Power BI and show how simple it is to display a dashboard of geolocated sign-ins by user and device.

 

Assumptions

The user creating Power BI reports has an Azure AD Premium and Power BI licenses assigned

Note, if a new user account was recently created, I recommend waiting a day for the sign-in data to fully populate otherwise no sign-in data will be present.  Check the Azure AD Premium admin portal for sign-in activity for the user periodically.  Once the sign-in data is present, refresh the Power BI dataset connection to pull it into Power BI.  More details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-reporting-faq

 

First we’ll need to sign into Power BI and pull in the Azure AD Activity Logs Content Pack.  Do this in Power BI by selecting Get Data, Services (Get), then search for Azure.  Select Azure Active Directory Activity Logs (Preview) from the search results and provide your Azure AD domain name and then select next.

Once the Azure Active Directory Activity Logs (Preview) content is added we can begin to create a dashboard.  From the Power BI UI find the “Azure Active Directory Activity Logs” under Dataset and select it.  Under “Visualizations” select Map and under “Fields” expand “Signin Activity” and select City, Country, Name, and Total Signins.  Without any further modifications your map should look similar to the following:

 

image

 

Feel free to play around with the data to get the information you find most interesting or better yet, what your security team will find most interesting.  Hover over the data circles to display additional information about the data point.

 

Now a map of sign-ins may be all that is required, however I went a step further and created two slicers to drill in on certain data points.  To add slicers, select the Slicer image from under Visualizations from under Fields expand “Unique Users” and then select “Details.Name”.

 

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To add another slicer, repeat the process from above, only instead of expanding Unique Users, expand “Signin Activity” and then select “Device Information”

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Adding slicers enables me to check mark interesting information and drill down on that specific data point.  Pulling it all together the final dashboard looks like the following:

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If I want to hone in on a specific data point, all I need to do is select either a data point under one of the slicers as shown in the gif below:

AADSigninPowerBI

 

Update
Add a slicer for date and time to show time based sign-in activity:

2017-03-30

This was just a simple method of creating a Power BI report that show’s a lot of rich data points that may help you understand where your users are logging in across the globe from what browser or device.  In addition, use the Azure AD Premium to create conditional access policies to protect user identities, corporate information, and block malicious devices, apps, and browsers from unsecure locations.

Azure AD Security – Protect Those Accounts, Services, and Audit Access!

Everyday I’m asked questions about Enterprise Mobility + Security as well as other Microsoft services. I’m also asked how we can provide single-sign on to SaaS and on-premises applications using Azure AD Premium. What surprises me though is how few organizations ask me about providing additional protection layers to protect accounts as well as the services themselves from credentials that have been compromised (unless I bring the topic up).  However, not a day goes by where I’m not asked about second factor authentication (i.e. Multi-Factor Authentication). Although MFA is extremely important and I highly recommend turning it on and testing within your organization, there are other important security mechanisms that can be turned on as well.

As you may have heard, identity is the new control plane, meaning protection starts at the account.

Azure AD Identity Protection

Do you have cloud only accounts or are you synchronizing your Active Directory accounts to Azure AD (e.g. O365, Dynamics CRM, etc.)? If you’re using O365 then you are, regardless of what identity provider you’re using. Azure AD Identity Protection can help you secure those identity today.

In a previous post I walked through setting up and implementing Azure AD Identity Protection, however below is a video where in the first half I log in as a user using a Tor browser and I’m able to access the service without challenge. In the second half, I turn on identity protection and when I attempt to sign on using a Tor browser, I’m challenged with multi-factor. A simple sign-on policy can protect you and your users from irregular sign-on activity and stolen credentials.

 

Azure AD Identity Protection Demo

Azure AD Privileged Identity Management (PIM)

Protecting the account itself is in my opinion non-negotiable and if you’re using Azure, O365, Dynamics CRM, Intune, or any other Microsoft services that leverage Azure AD, I highly recommend turning on Azure AD Identity Protection. However, what about protecting access to the service itself? You can by using Azure AD Privileged Identity Management.

What is Azure AD Privileged Identity Management?

Organizations want to minimize the number of people who have access to secure information or resources, because that reduces the chance of a malicious user getting that access. However, users still need to carry out privileged operations in Azure, Office 365, or SaaS apps. Organizations give users privileged access in Azure AD without monitoring what those users are doing with their admin privileges. Azure AD Privileged Identity Management helps to resolve this risk.

Azure AD Privileged Identity Management helps you:

  • See which users are Azure AD administrators
  • Enable on-demand, “just in time” administrative access to Microsoft Online Services like Office 365 and Intune
  • Get reports about administrator access history and changes in administrator assignments
  • Get alerts about access to a privileged role

Azure AD Privileged Identity Management can manage the built-in Azure AD organizational roles, including:

  • Global Administrator
  • Billing Administrator
  • Service Administrator
  • User Administrator
  • Password Administrator

Source

However, those are not the only roles available, did you know Exchange Online, Skype for Business, Intune, and many other roles are available as well? Which means global admins can protect access to elevated admin permissions and require admins to request access as well as provide additional info before their credentials are elevated.

More details about additional roles available in Azure AD PIM here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/active-directory-privileged-identity-management-roles

The following video steps through a user elevating permissions to access the admin console for Skype for Business using Azure AD Privileged Identity Management. The user is only allowed one hour to accomplish their task (global admin can adjust the policy to span 1 to 72 hours if needed per role), once the one hour is up, the user would need to go through the process again to elevate their account permissions.

Azure AD PIM Demo

Reporting

Reporting on identity and access is critical as well. It’s important to have systems in place to protect identities and services, however it’s equally important to have insight as to who’s accessing the services, from where, from what, how, and when. Last week the Azure AD team announced an Azure AD content pack for Power BI.

Here are a few reports from a fresh environment I’ve created:

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For more details on how to get started with Azure AD and the Power BI content pack please visit: https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/azure-active-directory-meets-power-bi/preview/

I encourage everyone to start protecting your identities and services today. There’s always going to be risk, why not reduce the risk by implementing safeguards to prevent unchallenged access.

Azure Information Protection… a log journey

 

Azure Information Protection (AIP) provides the ability to protect and classify information. For example, AIP policies can be created and used to classify, label, and protect data from leaking such as credit card numbers, social security numbers, or classify, label, and protect based off key words and so on.

For this post, I will not dive into details about how data protection, classification and labeling work, because there is already plenty of great documentation the teams at Microsoft provide out there on the web.  Rather I will focus on logging and reporting.  I’ll assume you’re already familiar with AIP or are using it today in some fashion.

If you’re interested in learning more about Azure Information Protection and what it can do for your organization, please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud-platform/azure-information-protection

Within the Azure Information Protection umbrella we have a service called Azure Rights Management Services (Azure RMS). You’ll hear Azure Information Protection and Azure RMS terms interchanged, however I’ll stick with the term Azure RMS for the next section of the post.

 

Azure RMS

Azure RMS provides the ability to protect content, whether it’s an email or file.  Azure RMS templates which contain content permissions such as blocking printing, forwarding, editing, and much more.

To learn more about Azure RMS please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/understand-explore/what-is-azure-rms

I encourage everyone to read through the Azure RMS FAQ as well because it will answer most questions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/get-started/faqs-rms

 

Assuming you have Azure RMS set up and your users are protecting content, the next stage is to learn about how to access the Azure RMS logs.  Log entries are generated as users apply Azure RMS templates files, share protected content with users, and when users attempt to open Azure RMS protected content.

The following link does a very good job at walking through accessing Azure RMS log files: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/deploy-use/log-analyze-usage

Once the logs are downloaded using the instructions provided in the previous link, use logparser (described within the link above) to consolidate the logs into a .CSV.

 

With a .CSV file full of Azure RMS log history we can create reports from it.  We can create tables within Excel or use a cloud service such as Microsoft Power BI to import the logs into to create reports and dashboards or utilize Microsoft Log Analytics to upload the logs to create dashboards as well (more on Log Analytics in the next section).

For example, I imported the .CSV file to Power BI and created a report that shows Azure RMS protected documents and who accessed them:

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I also created a Power BI report showing who shares the most Azure RMS protected files:

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Lastly, I created a report to view when and what files were protected and shared:

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The options are endless using services such as Microsoft Power BI and you can get as creative as you’d like with reporting and dashboards.

 

Classification and Labeling

Classification and Labeling provides users the ability to classify and label content. To learn more about classification and labeling and how to install the client please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/understand-explore/what-is-information-protection

I encourage everyone to read through the Azure Information Protection FAQ as well because it will answer most questions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/information-protection/get-started/faqs-infoprotect

 

With classification and labeling, logging is localized to the Windows device via event viewer. Logging events occur when a user changes the classification label, for example changing a document labeled as confidential to personal. The classification profile I have configured requires a justification for changing the classification label and that justification is also logged in event viewer. However, having logs localized to a device makes it difficult to create a centralized report typically used for auditing or monitoring purposes. So, we must get creative with centralizing logging and reports for classification.

 

Microsoft offers a service called Log Analytics (part of the Operations Management Suite or OMS) that will ingest logs from a variety of formats. Log Analytics is similar to a SIEM (Security Information and Event Management) system, some may even call it a SIEM.

To view more details on Log Analytics please visit: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/log-analytics-overview/

 

Working with Log Analytics 

I have a Windows client where I downloaded the Log Analytics agent to (as well as has the Information Protection client installed). To download the Log Analytics agent, sign into https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/cloud-platform/operations-management-suite (create a trial if you don’t already have a subscription) and select the “Settings” cog on the left, then “Connected Sources” and download the version of the agent that aligns to your device (e.g. 32 or 64 bit).

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Once the Log Analytics agent is downloaded to the Windows device with the classification client installed, install it and run through the wizard to register the device with the Log Analytics subscription.

 

After client installation and registration is complete, within Log Analytics select the “Settings” cog and then select “Data” and “Windows Event Logs”. Add the Windows event logs you wish to monitor using the “+” sign. The “Azure Information Protection” log will contain the Azure Information Protection (classification) events. 

Note: past events from Event Viewer will not be sent to Log Analytics, only new events that are created after the Log Analytics agent will.  This is important because if there were classification label changes that took place before the Log Analytics agent was installed they will not be sent to Log Analytics, only new events post Log Analytics client install will.

 

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Once the Log Analytics logging configuration is completed, start creating events by changing the classification label in a document. Watch the video below for an example:

December 2016 Update – with the release of the new AIP Client, new event IDs are now logged in Event Viewer as well as other features (updated images below).  More details here: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/enterprisemobility/2016/12/07/azure-information-protection-december-preview-now-available/ 

AIP_EventLogging

 

Now that we have logs in event viewer (and the device is connected to Log Analytics), navigate to Log Analytics and query for all Azure Information Protection events as shown below:

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Save the query, give it a name, and add the query to your dashboard for a more real-time view as shown below:

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That’s all for now, I hope you find this useful when you’re looking to manage logs that Azure Information Protection creates as well as creating reports and dashboards for visibility and compliance.