Intune, Azure AD, and Zscaler Private Access

Securing the perimeter has become increasingly difficult with more and more services moving to the cloud and users needing, no, expecting, access from their personal devices. The days of relying on the walls of a network to “trust” access are fading fast, and some would say they’re long gone. This is why organizations are using Microsoft technologies to build out zero trust networks where they rely on device and user claims to evaluate access to resource both on and off network. As I’ve written about in the past, security comes in layers, and zero trust encompasses many layers of security behind the scenes.

Over the past few years, Microsoft has worked with many security and management vendors to integrate with Microsoft Intune and other solutions in EMS such as Azure Active Directory.

The following list is just an example of the many technology partnerships Microsoft has in place today.

To keep up to date with Microsoft security partners please visit: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/enterprise-mobility-security/microsoft-intune?rtc=1

For this month’s post I’ll focus on Intune, Azure Active Directory, as well as a Microsoft security partner, Zscaler, particularly Zscaler Private Access and its integration with Azure AD and Intune.

What is Zscaler Private Access?

According to Christopher Hines, Head of Product Marketing at Zscaler:

“The Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) service provides users with seamless and secure access to private applications without placing them on the network and without exposing apps to the internet. Allowing enterprises to embrace a software-defined perimeter that supports all private apps and environments.”

More details about Zscaler may be found by visiting: : https://help.zscaler.com/zpa/getting-started/what-zscaler-private-access

Before we get started, I want to give special thanks to the following individuals I collaborated with for this post:

    • Tyler Castaldo – Microsoft Program Manager – Intune
    • David Creedy – Senior Product Manager – Web Security
    • Christopher Hines – Head of Product Marketing – ZPA and Zscaler App

Let’s get started

Zscaler SSO Setup

First, we need to set up Zscaler with Azure so we can provide SSO as users access the app. Once the user accesses the the Zscaler App on their device, they’ll be passed through to Azure AD for sign-on.

Setting up Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) requires a few steps so I won’t go through them, however the steps are well documented here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/active-directory/saas-apps/zscalerprivateaccess-tutorial

In addition, Zscaler has also created their own documentation that may be referenced as well:

Adding Zscaler App to Intune for deployment

For this post I focus on iOS and Android. However, Zscaler is also supported on macOS and Windows 10 (more details at the bottom of this post).

After SSO is set up with Zscaler and Azure AD, we now need to add the Zscaler App to Intune for deployment.

Navigate to portal.azure.com or devicemanagement.microsoft.com and select “Client apps -> Apps”

Select “Add” then App Type and from the dropdown select iOS. Search for Zscaler and select “Zscaler App” as shown below. Add the app and assign it to a group for deployment.

For Android, repeat the steps above, however for the “App type” select “Android“. Use Managed Google Play in the console to search for Zscaler, then add and assign the app to a group for deployment.

Note: if you haven’t set up Managed Google Play with Intune yet, you will find details steps on how to do so by visiting: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/connect-intune-android-enterprise

When performing a search for “Zscaler” under apps in Intune you should see both assigned apps.

Configuring the Zscaler App using a VPN policy for iOS and app config for Android

Configuring Zscaler Private Access for iOS in Intune is straightforward as Intune has the settings available directly in the Intune adming portal UI as shown below.

Note: the “Organization’s cloud name” is case sensitive and FQDN and key/value pairs are optional, for more details please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/vpn-settings-ios#base-vpn-settings.

Select how the VPN will be launched:

Configure additional settings your organization requires to provide access to applications bridged by Zscaler:

For Android, we need to create an app configuration policy and assign it to the Zscaler App we added earlier.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-configuration-policies-use-android

Create an app configuration policy by navigating to “Client apps -> App configuration policies”

Select “Add”, provide the policy a name and from the “Device enrollment type” drop-down select “Android”.

Under “Associated app” select the Zscaler App added earlier.

Under “Configuration settings” select “Use configuration designer” from the drop-down and select all the options provided. Select ok to begin configuring the values.

Configure the values based on how your Zscaler environment is configured. In my case, my Zscaler environment is set up in Azure so I utilized the cloud name for the service in Azure as well as the domain my users log into. For username, I selected variable and chose “Partial UPN”.

Once all the settings are configured select “Ok” to complete the setup.

Note: you’ll notice the “deviceToken” value is set to “DummyValue”. This value isn’t needed when Azure AD is used as the identity provider (IdP), however it is needed in the profile, so just add it and type in whatever you like for the value. Also, please note the “Organization’s cloud name” is case sensitive.

After you’re finished with the app config policy, be sure to assign it to the same group you assigned the Zscaler App to.

Client experience

On first launch, the Zscaler App on iOS and/or Android it will redirect to sign-on using Azure AD, however subsequent launches of the Zscaler App will sign-in automatically.

Azure AD Conditional Access

To prevent access to an application Zscaler Private Access is securing access for, we need to create an Azure AD conditional access policy. The Azure AD Conditional Access policy will ensure the device and/or user meets compliance policies (e.g. Intune) before allowing access.

Navigate the Azure Active Directory in the Azure portal and select “Conditional Access”

Provide a name for the policy and under Cloud app add “Zscaler Private Access” and add the Zscaler cloud app used to access resources, i.e. the organization cloud name that points to the app we added earlier. The cloud app I utilize is called Zscaler ZSCloud as shown below.

Select the device platforms to target the Azure AD CA policy, since I’m focusing on iOS and Android in this post, I select iOS and Android from the devices platforms list.

Now grant access if the device is marked as compliant by Intune, enable the policy and save.

Note: additional conditions and access controls may be checked if needed.

If the device is compliant with Intune compliance policies, Zscaler will connect the user to the application. If the device isn’t compliant, Azure AD Conditional Access will block access to the application Zscaler provides access until the compliance issue is remediated.

Note: currently there is an issue with Conditional Access and Android Enterprise where the device is treated as not enrolled.  Zscaler is working through this and we’ll provide an update as soon as the issue is resolved.

Let’s see this in action

I’m testing with my Android device enrolled with Intune under Android Enterprise Device Owner as a fully managed device. The Zscaler Private Access (ZPA) App and ZPA App configuration is automatically deployed.

Intune_Zscaler.gif

Conclusion

In summary we learned how to set up Zscaler with Azure and provide SSO using Azure Active Directory. We also learned how to set up Zscaler Private Access App configuration and app deployment with Microsoft Intune. Finally, we learned how to set up an Azure Active Directory Conditional Access policy to further secure application access with Zscaler based on Intune device compliance.

I hope this post helps you and your organization further secure corporate applications, devices, users, and resources using Microsoft Intune, Azure Active Directory, and Zscaler Private Access. If you’re a Zscaler customer today, go out and give these steps a try.

Appendix

Information on setting up Zscaler for Windows and MacOS

Intune MacOS management capabilities

Back in 2015 I wrote a blog about Mac management with Intune, however it’s been a few years and I feel it’s time we re-visit Mac management with Intune to learn more about what’s changed. You’ll soon learn there’s been a significant amount of progress and since my first post Intune now has a lot of native Mac management capabilities built in.

First let’s look at MacOS enrollment options with Intune.

MacOS enrollment options

There are two methods to enroll MacOS with Intune, user driven or using Device Enrollment Program.

User driven enrollment

For user driven enrollment the end user will need to sign into the web based version of the company portal via https://portal.manage.microsoft.com

If the user already had a device registered it will show on the screen, if the Mac is the first device being enrolled, they will see the following:

Once the user selects “Add this one by tapping here” they’ll be prompted to download the Intune Company Portal app.

After the Company Portal is downloaded and installed, open it up and you’ll be asked to sign-in using your corporate credentials. These are the same credentials used to sign into Office 365 (derived from Azure AD).

After sign-in is complete the device will begin the enrollment process.

For more details on user driven Mac enrollment please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune-user-help/enroll-your-device-in-intune-macos-cp

Apple Device Enrollment Program

The concept of the Apple DEP is to associate devices with an organization and to streamline the enrollment process, similar to enrolling Apple iOS devices. However, enrollment requires a different process by associating an Apple enrollment token with Intune. After the enrollment token is added and enrollment profile is created in Intune and associated with the enrollment token.

During the enrollment profile creation process you’ll be asked to select user affinity (i.e. userless or user associated). Once user affinity is selected, you’ll also select whether or not you’ll allow users to remove the enrollment profile via the “Locked enrollment” setting.  Finally, you’ll customize the setup assistance which allows for hiding setup screen, e.g. Apple Pay, Siri, Registration, etc.

For more details on the Apple enrollment token process with Intune please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/device-enrollment-program-enroll-macos

Conditional access

An exciting feature of Azure AD is the ability to target certain device platforms (e.g. MacOS) and set a series of conditions for access by creating conditional access policies in Azure AD.

Compliance

Azure AD and Intune compliance policies also play a role in access. Step through the compliance policies below to view the restrictions that may be enabled for the device to be compliant.

Device Health

System integrity protection prevents malicious apps from modifying protected files and folders.

Device Properties

Specify which OS version and builds you’ll allow before accessing corporate resources.

System Security

Configured password and password integrity, storage encryption, firewall, and gatekeeper to project against malware.

Actions to take for non-compliance

Take action when devices are not compliant with the compliance policy by sending the user a mail and/or locking the device.

Associating an Intune compliance policy with Azure AD conditional access policy

Create an Azure AD conditional access policy to require the device be compliant to access corporate resources.

Looking at device configuration for MacOS there are a number of settings, and in my opinion, those settings address a lot of organizations requirements for Apple Mac management.

Device features

Device restrictions








Endpoint protection

Looking to protect the device further by configuring the firewall and controlling where apps are installed from? Gatekeep will help with those requirements.


Further configure firewall settings to device what you’ll allow in and which apps are allowed and/or blocked.


Certificates

Intune supports PKCS certificates for general and S/MIME purposes.



Device and user-based certificates are both supported via SCEP


VPN

Many VPN settings are available including 3rd party VPN support.


Make note of On-demand and per-app VPN


Use a proxy server? No problem!


Wi-Fi

Both Basic and Enterprise Wi-Fi profiles are supported with various auth types.


Customize with Apple Configurator

Don’t see a setting in the UI, not to worry as you can create a custom profile using Apple Profile Manager and/or Apple Configurator and upload the payload for delivery through Intune.


App deployment

Both line of business and Office apps are supported right from the UI.


When selecting “Line-of-business app” the MacOS app must be wrapped using the app wrapping tool for Mac which will wrap the app and give it an extension of .intuneMac.

The tool is available on GitHub: https://github.com/msintuneappsdk/intune-app-wrapping-tool-mac

To learn more about Mac app deployment with Intune please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/lob-apps-macos

One of my peers Scott Duffey @Scottduf has a great post on this topic: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/microscott/deploying-apps-to-macs-using-microsoft-intune/

Note: as of this post only .pkg files are supported nor are conversions from .dmg to .pkg

Microsoft + Jamf partnership

Microsoft has also has a partnership with Jamf. Jamf also provides MacOS management and if your organization currently utilizes Jamf and would like to receive the benefits of integrating Jamf with Intune you can do this today with Jamf Pro. So, what does this mean?

MacOS devices managed by Jamf remain managed by Jamf when Intune comes into the picture (thus are only registered with Intune not enrolled) and integrating Jamf Pro with Intune provides a path for Jamf to send signals in the form of inventory to Intune. Intune will use compliance policies to evaluate the Jamf signals and in turn send signals over to Azure AD stating whether the device is compliant or not. The Azure AD conditional access policy will kick in and based on your configuration of the conditional access policy, will either block or further challenge the user to remediate before access company resources.

For more details about Intune and Jamf integration please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/conditional-access-integrate-jamf

Jamf also has a whitepaper about Intune integration: https://www.jamf.com/resources/technical-papers/integrating-with-microsoft-intune-to-enforce-compliance-on-macs/

That’s it for now, however Microsoft is always releasing updates for Intune.  Check back monthly with What’s new in Microsoft Intune and be sure to check which Intune features are under development by visiting: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/in-development

Android Kiosk Enrollment and Microsoft Intune

Last month I wrote about the different Android enrollment scenarios Microsoft Intune supports. For this month’s post, I’m focusing on the Android enterprise enrollment process, specifically single purpose device enrollment (e.g. kiosk) using a factory reset device.

Note: the device must be factory reset to enroll using Android enterprise.

Let’s get started

Create an Azure AD Group

Create a group in Azure AD that will dynamically add Android enterprise devices to it. This group will be associated with the Android enterprise enrollment profile. To do this,

  1. Navigate to portal.azure.com, locate and select Azure Active Directory
  2. Select Groups > New group
  3. Group type should = Security
  4. Provide a name for the group such as “Android Enterprise Kiosk Profile”
  5. Membership type = Dynamic device
  6. Select Dynamic device members

Use a simple rule using the “enrollmentProfileName” attribute to create the dynamic rule as shown below:

Create Android enterprise device enrollment profile

  1. Find and select Microsoft Intune from portal.azure.com
  2. Under device enrollment > Android enrollment select “Kiosk and task device enrollments”
  3. Create a new enrollment profile by selecting “Create”
  4. Provide a name and select an expiration date for the Token (this can be used to register devices with a token or QR code if necessary)

Add apps from Managed Google Play

  1. Navigate to the Managed Google Play account by selecting Mobile apps > Managed Google Play > Open the managed Google Play store
  2. Search for and add the “Managed Home Screen” app and additional apps you’d like on the locked task screen for the device.
  3. Sync with Managed Google Play within Intune and assign the apps and/or weblinks to the kiosk group created earlier.

For the apps to show up on the locked task screen (i.e. kiosk device) we must do two things:

  1. Under Mobile apps in Intune, assign the apps to the Azure AD group we created earlier (“Kiosk and task device enrollments” in my case), including assigning the Managed Home Screen.
  2. In the configuration profile we’ll create next, under kiosk add the same apps, except the Managed Home Screen (leave the Managed Home Screen out of the configuration profile).

Creating an Android enterprise kiosk configuration profile

  1. Within Intune select Device configuration > Profiles > Create Profile
  2. Select Properties > Platform = Android Enterprise, Profile type = Device restrictions
  3. Under settings select Kiosk > Kiosk mode: either select Multi-app or Single app kiosk. For this post I’ve selected Multi-app kiosk.
  4. Select Add and add the apps previously added to Managed Google Play that were synced with Intune. Remember, do not add the Managed Home Screen app (otherwise it will show up as an app on the screen of the kiosk device which isn’t necessary).

For the remaining settings, feel free to configure the other settings to match your business requirements.

Enrolling devices

There are various methods for enrolling a device shown in the table below:

Enrollment method Minimum Android OS supported
NFC (Near Field Communication) 5.1+
Token entry (manual setup) 6.0
QR Code 7.0
Zero Touch (ZTE) 8.0

For more details about Android kiosk device enrollment with Intune please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/android-kiosk-enroll#set-up-android-kiosk-management

Below are the series of steps performed when my Pixel 2 device is enrolled with Intune with Android enterprise as a multi-app kiosk using a QR code, of course if you prefer, zero-touch is available on supported Android (8.0+) devices as well:

 

Tap on the screen six times

I tapped 5 times and it’s asking me for 1 more tap

 

Needs to download the QR reader app before QR code scan

 

Connect to Wi-Fi so we can download the QR reader

 

Once connected to Wi-Fi the device checks for updates

 

Downloading Google Play Store

 

Checking device info…

 

Installing QR Reader

 

Once the QR Reader is installed it will use the camera to scan the QR code under the Android enterprise enrollment profile created earlier

 

QR code is accepted and we’re prompted to continue setting up the device.

 

Updating the Google Play Store again which is connecting to the Managed Google Play store

 

Downloading Google Play services…

 

Uploading Google Play services…

 

Finish device updates

 

Registering the device with Intune

 

Intune device configuration policy we created earlier is now applied

 

The Managed Home Screen is applied and the apps we assigned earlier are shown on the locked down kiosk screen.

Android + Intune = Android management

When I speak with organizations who are considering Android devices there’s usually the question of, “which management option should we choose?”. The answer to the question requires a clear understanding of the scenarios the organization would like to bring under management such as personal devices or corporate devices or even purpose-built devices (e.g. inventory scanners, digital signage, etc.).

There are many different versions of Android from many different OEMs and choosing and supporting each version can be challenging. However, as I’ll discuss later in this post, Android enterprise aims to address OEM fragmentation while providing a variety of management options. Fortunately, Microsoft Intune will address various Android management methods available today including those offered with Android enterprise, so let’s look at how Android management is accomplished with Intune.

The table below walks through each available Android device management scenario, how Microsoft Intune supports it, as well as items to evaluate when considering each option.

Device Management Type Enrollment Type Intune Management
Android Device Admin
Considered legacy administration, the Android device administration API has provided APIs to manage the Android device since Android 2.2. The issue with device admin is there are only so many management APIs available, the user experience is challenging, and according to Google, device admin will be depreciated in 2019. With Android Q, device admin will not be available at all.Device Admin requires an Android device to be enrolled via an MDM and requires various administrator permissions during certain enrollment scenarios. As such, device admin offers insufficient privacy for BYOD, insufficient management capabilities for corporate owned devices, and a poor user experience all around. In addition, device admin is less secure than Android enterprise and device admin is not ideal for an environment requiring minimal or no touch enrollment.To learn more about device admin deprecation please visit: https://developers.google.com/android/work/device-admin-deprecation
Intune supports devices enrolled with device admin on Android 4.4+

To enroll a device to Intune using device admin please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune-user-help/enroll-your-device-in-intune-android

In addition, Intune App Protection policies are supported with device admin (or without enrollment): https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-protection-policy

For BYOD, Intune App Protection policies are a great choice as the policies protect the corporate data at the app layer without requiring the user to enroll their device.

Samsung KNOX Standard
With Samsung devices, Samsung added their own management APIs which expands the management capabilities for devices enrolled with device admin.  An example is managing the email profile for the native email app on a Samsung device.KNOX is only available with certain Samsung devices so utilizing other OEM devices would require device admin or Android enterprise.Note: Samsung has announced the unification of KNOX and Android enterprise. More details may be found here: https://www.samsungknox.com/en/blog/android-enterprise-and-samsung-knox-your-questions-answered-hereSamsung also offers KNOX Mobile Enrollment (KME) which allows for automatic enrollment of devices even after a reset. KME is supported starting with Android 2.4 and KME is beneficial for mass enrollment of devices without having to touch each one. Devices may be manually and/or added through a carrier to an MDM. After which, users will experience a streamlined enrollment process which removes the touch points required by device admin.KNOX Mobile Enrollment is only available with Samsung devices so if no touch enrollment is needed for other device OEMs, Android enterprise may be an option.To learn more about KNOX Mobile Enrollment please visit: https://www.samsung.com/us/business/solutions/samsung-knox/mobile-security-solutions/knox-mobile-enrollment/
Intune supports KNOX standard without additional licensing for KNOX. However, KNOX also requires Device Admin enrollment as well. Once a device is enrolled with an MDM the end user will also see prompts about KNOX after which both device admin and KNOX policies may be deployed to the device. KNOX Mobile Enrollment streamlines the enrollment process by enrolling the device automatically.

To learn more about enrolling a device that supports Samsung KNOX with Intune please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/android-enroll#end-user-experience-when-enrolling-a-samsung-knox-device

In addition, Intune App Protection policies are supported with Samsung KNOX: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-protection-policy

Intune supports KME and to learn more about setting up KME with Intune please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/android-samsung-knox-mobile-enroll

In addition, Intune App Protection policies are supported with devices enrolled with KME: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-protection-policy

Up to this this point we’ve reviewed traditional management methods available on Android as well as enrolling and managing Android devices with Intune. However, if you’ve noticed, there seems to be a theme throughout and it’s around Android enterprise. It appears all paths are leading to Android enterprise so let’s learn about what Android enterprise is and how Intune will assist with managing devices enrolled using Android enterprise.

Android enterprise

There are two primary modes of management under Android enterprise (AE). Work profiles for BYOD and Device Owner for corporate owned devices.  More details on Android Enterprise device ownership please visit: https://developers.google.com/android/work/requirements 

Android enterprise
Android enterprise (AE) offers a variety of management scenarios for certified devices providing more robust management APIs over device admin. Although Android enterprise is supported on Android 5.0+, Google recommends 6.0 or later.Once a device is enrolled in an MDM such as Intune, Android enterprise has the concept of a work profile (formerly Android for Work) that separates or containerizes corporate applications and data on a personal device. The managed profile contains corporate data and allows only applications within the work profile to access the data within while leaving personal data separate. To learn more about work profiles please visit: https://support.google.com/work/android/answer/6191949?hl=enIn addition to work profiles, Android enterprise offers Device Owner mode where corporate owned devices are enrolled with an MDM and managed based on the purpose their intended for. To learn more about Android enterprise management for company-owned devices please visit: https://www.android.com/enterprise/management/To provision the device owner mode the device must be factory reset, unfortunately there are no migration paths to device owner mode from device admin. The provisioning process may be driven by NFC, QR code, or zero-touch. Previous versions of Android such as 5.0 and 5.1 can use an activation code to begin the enrollment process.For more details about device provisioning please visit: https://developers.google.com/android/work/prov-devicesTo learn more about AE management scenarios please visit: https://www.android.com/enterprise/management/Note: as stated previously, moving from device admin to Android enterprise requires a factory reset. Consider the ramifications of already deployed devices to end users and in the workplace before beginning a migration. A strategy of enrolling new devices with device owner while continuing to manage existing devices enrolled with device admin may be an option. Through attrition, devices will onboard using Android enterprise. As mentioned earlier, with Android Q, device admin will not be an option.
Intune supports Android enterprise purpose-built device management including single-use and work profiles which aligns with many organizational use cases.

Details on how to configure Intune to and manage devices supporting Android enterprise are below.

Management of Android enterprise managed profiles and other details may be found here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/android-enterprise-overview

Connect Intune to Android enterprise:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/connect-intune-android-enterprise

Android enterprise single-use (Kiosk) devices Intune enrollment: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/android-kiosk-enroll

In addition, Intune App Protection policies are supported with Android enterprise: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/intune/app-protection-policy

Applications, including LOB apps are published through managed Google play.

Selecting an enrollment option

Choosing an enrollment option really depends on the scenario and what your business requires. For example, if your devices require minimal or no touch enrollment you may consider KNOX Mobile Enrollment and/or Android enterprise. Since Android enterprise appears to be OEM agnostic, if the plan is to have various device OEMs deployed, devices supporting Android enterprise may be an option. However, if devices are used for kiosk, digital signage, ticket printing, inventory scanning, Android enterprise would be something to investigate as well. If devices are personal devices (BYOD), I recommend looking at Intune App Protection for unenrolled devices and/or Work Profiles. Lastly, before selection consider the short- and long-term ramifications of one option over another.

That’s it! We’ve reviewed the options available for Android enrollment and Intune, documentation on how to enroll Android devices, and the future of Android management through Android enterprise.

Add Windows Defender Browser Protection to Chrome with Intune

I recently read a really great post by Martin Bengtsson about utilizing Configuration Manager (SCCM) to force installation of the Windows Defender Browser Protection extension for Chrome. So I decided to take a different approach and deploy the extension utilizing a PowerShell script deployed through Microsoft Intune.

To learn more about the Windows Defender Browser Protection for Google Chrome please visit: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/windows-defender-browser/bkbeeeffjjeopflfhgeknacdieedcoml

Assumptions

Windows 10 device enrolled in Intune


Let’s get started

I created the following PowerShell script to add the Defender Chrome extension as a registry entry:

New-Item -Path HKLM:SoftwarePoliciesGoogleChrome -Name ExtensionInstallForcelist –Force

$RegKey =”HKLM:SoftwarePoliciesGoogleChromeExtensionInstallForcelist”

Set-ItemProperty -path $RegKey -name 1 -value “bkbeeeffjjeopflfhgeknacdieedcoml;https://clients2.google.com/service/update2/crx”

I saved the script as a .ps1 file and added to Intune utilizing the steps below:

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Name the script, upload, and save

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Assign the script to a group

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Sync your Windows 10 device with Intune

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Sync the device with Intune 

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Registry Before sync

clip_image006[4]

Chrome without Defender browser protection

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Registry after sync

clip_image008[4]

Chrome with Defender browser protection

Once Chrome is launched, the extension is automatically downloaded to the extension directory and added to Chrome.

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Chrome extension directory

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In addition to configuration, Configuration Manager will also perform remediation if this is something you’re more concerned with, SCCM is the best path to go currently. Again read Martin Bengtsson’s detailed post for insight on deploying and remediating for the Windows Defender Browser Protection for Chrome extension through SCCM.

Windows 10 Group Policy vs. Intune MDM Policy who wins?

 

When I speak with organizations about managing Windows 10 devices with Microsoft Intune there is a concern about disruption of current projects to deploy new OSs, patches, etc.  When moving to Intune for managing Windows devices, Intune will leverage the built-in MDM agent vs. having to install another agent to manage Windows 10 devices.

 

With modern management of Windows 10, the process of updating and upgrading Windows 10 devices is seen as continual process.  Updating Windows doesn’t have to be seen a massive project, evaluate your current processes for updating Windows and look at updating Windows 10 as an ongoing predictable process for IT and end users.  In addition your users and company benefit from the latest security features built into Windows 10.

 

Managing Windows policies are also a concern when moving to a newer OS.  Traditionally, configuration policies are managed by Group Policy, however Modern Management of Windows 10 with Microsoft Intune also has a set of policies, even policies that are duplicative of Group Policy (where applicable, not all Group Policies are available via MDM or CSP).  In environments where Group Policies are deployed and managed by Intune there’s the question of which policy wins.  The following describes which policy wins according to Windows 10 version.

 

  • Windows 10 versions 1709 and earlier Group Policy will override MDM policies, even if an identical policy is configured in MDM.

  • Windows 10 version 1803 and beyond there is a new Policy CSP setting called ControlPolicyConflict that includes the policy of MDMWinsOverGP, where the preference of which policy wins can be controlled, i.e. Microsoft Intune MDM policy.

 

For more details about the new ControlPolicyConfict setting please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/client-management/mdm/policy-csp-controlpolicyconflict#controlpolicyconflict-mdmwinsovergp

 

What happens to the policy if the device is unenrolled from Intune?  If applicable, Group Policy will re-apply the policies in this scenario.

 

 

Setting up a policy

In the link above, the “scope” of the policy is set for “device” so we’ll need to target the policy at the device scope. 

 

To learn more about user and device scopes please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/client-management/mdm/policy-configuration-service-provider#policy-scope 

Since the ControlPolicyConfict policy applies to the device, we’ll have to utilize the following string: ./Device/Vendor/MSFT/Policy/Config/AreaName/PolicyName to configure the policy. 

 

Next replace AreaName/PolicyName with ControlPolicyConflict/MDMWinsOverGP

After the modification to the string, the policy should look like the following: ./Device/Vendor/MSFT/Policy/Config/ControlPolicyConflict/MDMWinsOverGP

 

Creating the policy

 

Let’s create a new policy in Intune to control the GP vs. MDM winner

 

  1. Navigate to portal.azure.com and locate Intune
  2. Select “Device configuration à Profiles à Create profile”
  3. Under Platform select Windows 10 and later
  4. Under Profile type select “custom” and “add”
  5. Name the custom setting with something intuitive
  6. For OMA-URI add the policy OMA-URI string: ./Device/Vendor/MSFT/Policy/Config/ControlPolicyConflict/MDMWinsOverGP
  7. For Data type select Integer and add the number 1

 

Supported values for this policy are as follows:

0 (default)

1 – The MDM policy is used and the GP policy is blocked.

 

 

 

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Let’s take a look how the policy is applied

  1. On the Windows 10 device, select the Windows icon > Settings > Accounts > Access work or school à under the account name select Info
  2. Sync with Microsoft Intune by selecting “Sync”
  3. Once the Sync as completed select “Create report”

 

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  • Once the report is completed a folder will open containing an .html file
  • Open the .html report and search for “MDMwins”

 

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GP Setting before the MDM policy takes place :

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MDM setting after the policy is applied (note: Windows 10 1803 is required to override the GP):

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Let’s take a look at a report in Intune regarding the policy and if it was successfully applied.  This useful to make sure the policies are actually applying or not.

 

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Logging

Being able to investigate modifications to a device is extremely important, especially when troubleshooting. 

 

In event viewer we can access the event where the policy was applied as shown below.  However digging through events, especially across multiple devices, can be a difficult process.  This is where Microsoft Operations Management Suite (OMS) comes in.

 

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Logging with Microsoft Operations Management Suite (OMS)

Within OMS there is the Log Analytics solution to manage logs from devices with the OMS agent installed.  I won’t go into details about installing the OMS agent, however I will say it’s straight forward.  Once the agent is installed (which I have it installed on all my devices so I can look at label changes with Azure Information Protection (see my previous post) and other aggregated information) we’ll need to grab the proper even log source name and populate that in Log Analytics.

 

 

Find and copy the event log source or name: Microsoft-Windows-DeviceManagement-Enterprise-Diagnostics-Provider

 

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Paste the event log path in Log Analytics to “Windows Event Logs under Settings > Data > Windows Event Logs” as shown below:

 

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Give the logs a few minutes to sync from the device to OMS, then run the query below in log analytics analyzer and look for the MDMWinsOverGP policy created above:

 

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For more details about Windows 10 MDM logging please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/client-management/mdm/diagnose-mdm-failures-in-windows-10

 

 

Evaluating existing Group Policies to determine migration to MDM

Use the MDM Migration Analysis Tool (MMAT) to evaluate which Group Policies have been set for a target user/computer and cross-reference against its built-in list of supported MDM policies.

 

Download the MDM Migration Analysis Tool (MMAT): https://github.com/WindowsDeviceManagement/MMAT

 

For additional details about creating custom ADMX policies please view the following two great videos:

 

Enable ADMX backed policies in Intune: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/videoplayer/embed/bdc9b54b-11b0-4bdb-a022-c339d16e7121

 

ADMX backed policy import example: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/videoplayer/embed/a59888b1-429f-4a49-8570-c39a143d9a73

 

Keep up to date with MDM policies and other features via What’s new in MDM enrollment and management

 

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/client-management/mdm/new-in-windows-mdm-enrollment-management

 

That’s it, we’ve learned that there is a new policy added to Windows 10 1803 that will control if MDM policies win over Group Policies (where applicable, not all Group Policies are available via MDM or CSP), how to investigate policies via event viewer, and aggregate those logs using Log Analytics (OMS).

 

 

Windows Information Protection – adding the Intune Company Portal for Windows as an exempt app

As of January 2019 this is no longer necessary as the Intune Company Portal app is now included in the default list of protected apps.



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Organizations using Windows Information Protection (WIP) may experience issues accessing the Intune Company Portal app.  Fortunately, exempting Intune Company Portal app and any other application from a WIP policy is straight forward.

 

To learn more about creating Windows Information Protection policies please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/information-protection/windows-information-protection/create-wip-policy-using-mam-intune-azure

 

 

Let’s get started

 

By exempting an application the following pertains:

 

If you’re running into compatibility issues where your app is incompatible with WIP, but still needs to be used with enterprise data, you can exempt the app from the WIP restrictions. This means that your apps won’t include auto-encryption or tagging and won’t honor your network restrictions. It also means that your exempted apps might leak.

Source: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/security/information-protection/windows-information-protection/create-wip-policy-using-mam-intune-azure#add-apps-to-your-allowed-apps-list

 

Since the Intune Company Portal App doesn’t store any sensitive company data, exempting it shouldn’t be an issue, however always check in with your security team to make sure.

 

The first step to exempting the Intune Company Portal App for Windows is to locate the app in the store.  I’ve done this for you below and even though the app may be accessed from the consumer and business store, all we really care about is the AppID at the end, i.e. “9wzdncrfj3pz”. 

As we can see, the AppID is the same regardless of what portal it was accessed from:

 

Windows Store Intune Company Portal app: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/p/company-portal/9wzdncrfj3pz

Windows Store for Business Intune Company Portal app: https://businessstore.microsoft.com/en-us/store/details/company-portal/9wzdncrfj3pz

 

 

Creating the WIP exemption policy

To create an app policy within Intune to exempt the Intune Company Portal app navigate to portal.azure.com à Intune à Mobile Apps à App protection policies à Add a policy

 

  1. Give the policy a name and select Exempt apps
  2. Select Add apps
  3. From the drop-down menu select Store apps

 

At this point you’ll need to have some information handy about the app.  Fortunately, there is an easy method of extracting this data using the URL below.  I’ve already accessed the URL below; however, you can do this for any store app to find the name, publisher info, and product name.

 

Access following and replace the ID with the ID of the app you’d like to exempt, in this case, the Intune Company Portal app ID: 9wzdncrfj3pz

https://bspmts.mp.microsoft.com/v1/public/catalog/Retail/Products/9wzdncrfj3pz/applockerdata

For more details about accessing app package info please visit: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/client-management/mdm/get-product-package 

The following is the output you’ll see in the browser in JSON format:

 

{

  “packageFamilyName”: “Microsoft.CompanyPortal_8wekyb3d8bbwe”,

  “packageIdentityName”: “Microsoft.CompanyPortal”,

  “windowsPhoneLegacyId”: “0b4016fc-d7b2-48a2-97a9-7de3b5ea7424”,

  “publisherCertificateName”: “CN=Microsoft Corporation, O=Microsoft Corporation, L=Redmond, S=Washington, C=US”

}

 

Now that we have the JSON information about the Intune Company Portal store app (using the URL above), we need to add that data to the policy as shown below. 

Once finished adding the information, select OK and assign the policy.  On the Windows device, either wait for your devices to sync with Intune of force a sync from Settings à Accounts à Access work or school.

 

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Once the policy updates you’ll be able to access the Intune Company Portal app:

 

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If you’re interested, I go into detail about WIP a previous post: https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/cbernier/2017/05/19/windows-information-protection-explained-windows-10-creators-update/ 

That’s it, if you’re not utilizing Windows Information Protection today, I highly encourage everyone to look into the benefits of protecting corporate information across personal and corporate owned devices with Intune, including Windows, iOS, and Android.